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Position papers

WindEurope Position Papers

  • Brexit coalition letter April 2018

    As leading European and UK companies and investors, we recognise that climate change poses one of the greatest long-term threats to our economies and societies. We strongly urge both the UK and EU27 to commit to continuing to work together to meet the commitments set out in the Paris Agreement, in any future relationship. To ensure this is achieved, we call on you, in the Brexit negotiations, to develop a comprehensive Climate and Energy Chapter, which covers both trade and non-trade issues.

    Read the open letter

  • The Electrification Alliance on the Mobility Package March 2018

    Transport is the only sector in Europe in which emissions have increased in the last decades. Today,
    transport emissions are nearly 20% higher than in 1990, while European transport needs are expected to grow significantly until 2050.

    Without ambitious action, transport is set to be the biggest GHG emitter in Europe by 2030.

    In parallel, from 1990 till 2015, the carbon intensity of electricity in Europe decreased by more than
    33% and is on track to complete carbon-neutrality well before 2050.

    Read the open letter

  • Open letter from the Eletrification Alliance on the Multi-Annual Financial Framework March 2018

    The co-signatories of this letter represent a broad cross-section of European interests striving to support the EU’s efforts to meet its climate commitments under the Paris Agreement and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

    We highlight the opportunities coming from the smart and efficient electrification of European energy use as a means to achieving the EU’s climate commitments while improving its competitiveness, creating high quality jobs, and asserting global industrial leadership in the development and deployment of new technologies.

    Electrification is further driven by trends in the economy on fuel efficiency, digitalisation and automation, which in turn can make technology work for vulnerable sectors of society such as low income households, local actors and SMEs. It is also a driver for cost reductions and increasing shares of renewables.

    We would like to express the importance of aligning the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) post-2020 with these commitments and opportunities, which we believe requires the European Commission to revisit its approach to energy infrastructure spending.

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  • Efficient markets for mainstream renewables March 2018

    European Energy Exchange and WindEurope welcome in a joint statement the adoption of the European Parliament’s position on the Electricity Directive and Regulation. Our organisations call now on policymakers to make the right choices in the upcoming trilogue negotiations. The reform of Europe’s electricity markets will be a success if the following elements are ensured: the phase-out of regulated prices, the recognition of future and forward markets, the grandfathering of priority dispatch and balancing regimes for existing renewables installations, a stable framework for bidding zones review and stricter rules governing on the introduction and the design of capacity mechanisms.

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  • Joint statement on Guarantees of Origin February 2018

    The signatories of this statement believe that Guarantees of Origin (GOs) are a reliable instrument to track and prove to consumers that a given share of electricity supplied to their home or business comes from renewable sources.

    The Clean Energy Package offers a unique opportunity to strengthen the GO system as more countries, consumers, and electricity suppliers begin to use it . As both European Parliament and Council have now agreed on their respective positions on the Renewable Energy Directive, this paper aims to draw the attention of policy makers to some key issues ahead of the trilogue negotiations.

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  • Joint statement on regulated retail prices February 2018

    WindEurope and other associations from the power sector call on the European Parliament and the Council to phase out regulated prices as part of the ongoing reform of the Electricity Directive. Enabling consumers to base their decisions during scarcity periods on market price signals is essential to further develop demand response and drive a cost-effective integration of renewables into the power system.

    The persistence of regulated electricity tariffs is one the reason why consumers have not fully benefited from the downward trend that wind power produces on the wholesale market. The future electricity market design should seek for an increased link between wholesale prices and retail prices in order to guarantee such pass-through effect to consumers.

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  • Offshore wind energy in the north sea November 2017

    The North Seas Energy Forum brings together representatives of the public, private and non-governmental sectors from the Northern Seas countries to discuss challenges and opportunities for regional cooperation in energy topics, particularly for the deployment and use of offshore wind energy.

    In the context of the second stakeholder forum meeting on 29th November 2017 at WindEurope’s Conference & Exhibition in Amsterdam, this paper brings together the industry position across many technical topics in order to inform participants and consolidate the key messages to communicate to policy makers.

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  • Wind energy and on-site energy storage November 2017

    Co-locating wind energy and storage technologies could offer many benefits: It could reduce the amount of curtailed electricity at times of grid congestion or system instability. It could help maintaining generation schedules communicated to system operators, thereby reducing imbalance charges and avoiding penalties for not fulfilling the performance committed to the system. It could enable wind power to provide a wider range of ancillary services, such as frequency containment reserve (FCR), improve reactive power provision and even black start capability. In small power systems with stability issues, storage can support wind farms to reduce ramp rates, smoothing out electricity generation.

    WindEurope’s paper discusses the possible functionalities of co-located wind energy and storage projects using examples from key ongoing projects. It uses information from WindEurope’s online database of co-located projects developed specifically to improve the industry knowledge. Approximately 400 MW of co-located projects have been identified globally, with three quarters of them already operational.

    WindEurope presents a number of policy recommendations to improve the market design for all storage projects and specifically for co-located ones. As industry gains more experience developing such projects, WindEurope will disseminate lessons learned on regulatory frameworks and incentive schemes.

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  • Joint industry letter for a simple and effective ‘Smartness Indicator’ November 2017

    WindEurope has joined efforts with other industry associations and NGOs from the energy, manufacturing, standardisation, construction and building sectors to raise the need for an effective smartness indicator for buildings. This indicator is introduced by the proposal for a revised Energy Performance of Buildings Directive. It aims at indicating a building’s ability to actively manage its internal, self-generation and/or storage for both heat and electricity. The European Commission is now working with a consortium of consultancies led by VITO on a joint study that should develop a common definition and methodology for this indicator.

    WindEurope and other associations call on the consortium to focus on active measures of flexibility in their study, and not the passive efficiency measures within a building which are already addressed by the Energy Performance Certificate. This would be the best way to ensure that the indicator becomes a meaningful tool for building owners and occupants in order to unlock the vast flexibility of Europe’s building stock, and eventually support the wider energy system to integrate larger shares of renewables.

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  • Strengthening the regional approach to system operation to boost renewables’ integration October 2017

    Europe needs to integrate ever-growing shares of renewable energy sources into the wholesale power market. This path is a no brainer for Europe and for the signatories of this statement.

    Today however, a number of hurdles are in the way of reaching this goal. This is in particular the case for cross-border capacity allocation. As wholesale markets are increasingly interconnected and coupled, further progress is fundamentally needed to reach the objective of a truly integrated Internal Energy Market.

    In particular, we call for on policy-makers to support a step-wise regional approach to system operation that optimise social welfare beyond national borders.

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  • Support a reliable regulatory framework for renewable energies in Europe October 2017

    The Clean Energy Package for all Europeans is an ambitious response to the climate challenges we are facing in Europe today.

    The ongoing decarbonisation, decentralisation and digitalisation of the energy sector offer ample of opportunities, as electricity becomes increasingly decarbonised and electrification of all sectors of the European economy progresses.

    The signatories of this statement call on the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union to support the development of a stable and predictable regulatory framework for renewable energies.

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  • European wind energy sets out concerns on a new governance mechanism in Clean Energy Package October 2017

    The wind industry today issued a letter to the European Council, setting out concerns regarding the ongoing Council deliberations on a new governance mechanism in the context of the Clean Energy Package.

    The European wind industry can make a substantial contribution to the energy transition. Onshore wind is now the cheapest form of new power generation capacity, and offshore is not far behind. Technology developments have also made it much easier and cheaper to integrate variable renewables in the energy system. Wind creates growth and jobs (now 300,000 across Europe) and reduces fossil fuel imports. And of course it also reduces CO2 emissions.

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  • Renewable Power for All: a call for an environmentally beneficial electrification and multi-sectoral integration September 2017

    Fighting climate change, air pollution and delivering the Paris Agreement commitments requires replacing fossil fuels by renewables within the power sector and beyond. As large amounts of competitive renewable electricity are today available, a rapid electrification of the most carbon intensive energy uses is the best and most efficient way to decarbonise and grow Europe’s economy.

    The following measures would help drive the decarbonisation and energy efficiency of the Transport, Heating and Colling sectors, thanks to the uptake of wind energy, and should be prioritised as part of current and forthcoming discussion on EU legislation:

    • A downward revision of the PEF for electricity so non-combustible renewables have a PEF below 1;
    • An increase of the fuel suppliers obligation in the Renewable Energy Directive to 10%;
    • Stringent post-2020 CO2 standards for cars in line with the Paris Agreement on climate;
    • Stronger requirements regarding the deployment of charging points for electric vehicles;
    • A revision of the Energy Taxation Directive that avoid favouring fossil fuels where electricity could also be used.

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  • EU RES associations position on dispatching regime July 2017

    The draft report published by Dr. Karins MEP proposes crucial changes to the current dispatching regime for generating installations using renewable energy sources. With this letter, the renewable energy industry wishes to emphasize three major elements that need to be considered by the rapporteur and the members of the ITRE committee when revising the dispatching regime for renewables.

    The following considerations are key for maintaining investments in renewables, and giving Europe a chance to fulfil its climate change targets and remain world number one in renewables.

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  • Financing wind energy beyond 2020 July 2017

    The Clean Energy Package foresees an EU level financing framework to help the Union deliver on its collective binding target of renewable energy in final energy consumption (Art 3.4 of the recast Renewable Energy Directive). This financing facility could support and incentivise countries to deliver on their national plans and avoid any potential gaps in the target.

    In the absence of legal binding renewable energy national targets, there is a need to incentivise Member States to deliver on the collective commitment by providing them with tools that attract investors to their markets. This paper elaborates on the main risks that investors will face in the post-2020 renewable energy context, and propose solutions at EU level to address the potential gap between available finance for renewables and deployment needs to meet the EU’s 2030 targets

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  • Unlock demand-side flexibility for European consumers, innovation and the climate June 2017

    WindEurope and the IDEAS platform (*) call on Members of the European Parliament and energy ministers to unlock the potential of demand-side flexibility in Europe. This resource not only benefits and empowers consumers, but also enables the integration of ever larger shares of renewables in the power system at least cost. The Clean Energy Package should address current market failures and set fair rules that will allow this take-off, such as: creating functioning wholesale markets, allowing consumers and third parties to value their flexibility and tackling the structural overcapacity of generation in Europe. Not delivering this risks affecting the Europe Union’s competitiveness, undermining its decarbonisation efforts as well as its opportunities for jobs and growth.

    (*) IDEAS is an informal stakeholders’ platform that contributes to the development and implementation of European policies and initiatives to drive the deployment of flexible demand-side resources in support of the EU’s goals in energy and climate, security of supply and competitiveness.

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  • Repowering and lifetime extension: making the most of Europe’s wind energy resource June 2017

    As every energy technology, wind energy assets have an end to their operational lifetime. A significant proportion of the installed EU wind fleet will come to the end of its lifetime between 2020 and 2030. These decommissioned wind energy assets will not count for the delivery of the EU 2030 renewable energy target.

    This paper seeks to align approaches on repowering across the EU in line with the proposed post-2020 renewable energy regulatory framework. The repowering provisions in the Clean Energy Package would guarantee that Member States are able to harness a higher share of wind energy at the best wind sites to the benefit of European consumers by 2030.

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  • Higher renewable energy ambition required to avoid deployment slowdown June 2017

    The Clean Energy for All Europeans package proposed by the European Commission in November last year suggests a European binding target of at least 27% renewable energy by 2030. This target’s lack of ambition translates to a slow-down in renewable energy deployment after 2020. Going below a target of 35% would mean that, over the next decade, Europe installs less new renewable energy capacity than in the current one, putting its competitive edge at risk. We therefore urge MEPs to support a binding target of at least 35% as being the bare minimum to keep momentum going in this fast-growing industry and ensure Europe reaps the economic benefits resulting from a sustained renewable energy deployment.

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  • Reviving wind markets and delivering on our 2030 objectives March 2017

    A reliable European renewable energy strategy is needed to create a business case for wind energy beyond 2020. WindEurope welcomes the spirit of the European Commission’s proposals for a new Governance Regulation and a recast Renewable Energy Directive. But it considers that Member States and the European Parliament should raise ambition towards a collective EU renewables target of at least 35% to make full use of the economic potential the energy transition offers.

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  • Building a European energy market fit for the energy transition March 2017

    WindEurope believes the legislative proposals for a revised electricity market design offer a unique chance to provide the industry with a predictable investment framework, to create fairer market conditions for all energy sources, and to seize the opportunities that come with a decentralised energy system. Getting the market design right today will determine whether the energy transition in Europe is achieved in the most cost-effective manner.

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  • WindEurope views on the TSO-DSO coordination – Enabling flexibility from distributed wind power March 2017

    Europe’s power system is undergoing a profound change. Most of the new generation capacity is being connected to distribution networks. Distributed generation could provide valuable services today to the system but some market design features impede the delivery of these services to the market.
    Utilising the services from distributed generation would lead to lower system costs (i.e. through higher competition). Additionally, optimising the use of flexibility resources could reduce the amount of curtailed wind and solar power, saving tax-payers money and maximising the use of carbon-free sources.

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  • Make green electricity markets work for consumers and energy transition March 2017

    At least 15 million European households are willing to actively support the transition towards a cleaner energy supply. They have already opted for a green electricity tariff with a 100% renewable fuel mix. This demand could be leading to increased investment in additional renewable installations and, aside from national support schemes, be another way to boost renewable energy generation.

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  • Manufacturers call on European institutions to strengthen EU industrial strategy February 2017

    92 trade associations have signed a Joint Declaration in the run-up to the Competitiveness Council calling on the EU to strengthen its industry strategy.

    European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker marked the reindustrialisation of Europe as a priority to ensure the EU remains a competitive global power as other countries including China, India and the USA step up their industrial policies. WindEurope together with European trade associations from other manufacturing sectors calls on the European Commission to:

    • reaffirm its commitment to reaching the target of 20% of GDP from industry, with an ambitious and realistic timeline;
    • adopt an Action Plan to tackle the challenges that the industrial sectors face, in the framework of a Communication that would include concrete steps and milestones; and
    • commit to implement this Action Plan in a timely manner and regularly report on progress.

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  • Creating a business case for wind after 2020 January 2017

    The investment climate in the European power sector is deteriorating. Projects become riskier and struggle to attract affordable capital owing to a lack of visibility on their long-term revenues. This is particularly relevant for wind energy projects, which require large upfront investment and are highly sensitive to financing conditions.

    This paper explains how revenue stabilisation mechanisms, complemented by spot market signals, can help mitigate risk while reducing the decarbonisation costs borne by final consumers. It also explores the potential of commercial long-term contracts (PPAs) between wind power producers and corporations, which are currently on the rise in Europe.

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  • The potential of energy sector integration November 2016
    • Sector integration is a win-win for the European energy system and a boost for the wider economy.
    • Sector integration is technically and economically feasible today.
    • Regulatory barriers must be removed to realise full potential.

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  • Associations call on Commission President Juncker to make EU market fit for renewables October 2016

    The continuation of the energy transition and, in particular, the continued cost-effective integration of renewables in the energy system require an appropriate market framework. The Commission’s upcoming legislative proposals on market design need to adjust market rules to flexible renewable energy generation.

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  • 11 companies call for investor protection in EU September 2016

    While the industry acknowledges the need to adjust regulatory frameworks over time to respond to declining technology costs and market developments, retroactive changes are a misguided answer and erode investor confidence in the EU energy infrastructure sector where costs are sunk from the moment of the investment and there is very limited ability to improve profitability thereafter. Accordingly, investors in the space have no choice but to expect long-term regulatory stability for renewable energy plants. Thus any regulatory change should be concerted, non-retroactive, non-discriminatory, and avoid any legal gaps that would undermine investor certainty.

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  • Wind energy: backbone of the EU global leadership in renewables September 2016

    The European Commission’s President Jean-Claude Juncker has pledged in 2014 to make the EU’s the “world number one in renewables”. Wind energy is set to be the backbone of the EU’s global leadership in renewables as it will provide the largest contribution – 23,9% – to the 2030 EU-wide renewable energy target. Global leadership requires proactive industrial, innovation and trade policies that sustain a vibrant home market. This paper aims to input to the Energy Union Integrated strategy for research, innovation and competitiveness, the European Union’s trade agenda and the upcoming legislative package on renewable energy and market design.

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  • Implementation guidelines for the network code requirements for generators July 2016

    In May 2016, ENTSO-e developed and published the European network code on requirements for generators. It provides a large number of not fully defined requirements and specifications. In many cases, these non-exhaustive requirements lead to ambiguity on the technical performance needed, as well as to uncertainty on the regulatory framework for implementing the new set of rules, which will apply as from May 2019.

    The present document aims at facilitating the implementation of the European network code by providing the views and expertise of the wind industry sector on the technical issues of fault ride through and reactive power capability.

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  • Associations say EU law must hold Member States to account on renewables ambition July 2016

    In October 2014, 28 EU Heads of State agreed that a binding target for renewables should be set at EU level to meet their collective climate and energy ambition. Since then, the European Parliament has consistently backed a binding renewable energy target for 2030, most recently in June 2016.

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  • System adequacy June 2016

    The EU power sector faces an investment dilemma owing to overcapacities and old infrastructure and the new to quickly reduce emissions in the power sector. A proper assessment on the future system adequacy has to happen before introducing regulatory mechanism that incentivise investments on additional capacity. WindEurope shows in this position paper the benefits for member states if they chose a coordinated regional approach, which is based on probabilistic methods that account for the contribution of variable renewable energy sources.

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  • Priority dispatch and curtailment June 2016

    Making the market fit for renewables requires additional efforts on curtailment rules and priority dispatch provision. The latter has been instrumental in bringing wind power growth to covers 11.4% of the EU’s total electricity consumption today. Current discussions on its removal and the possibility to apply retroactive changes undermine investors’ confidence, which could slow down the agreed energy transition. WindEurope explains the market design conditions necessary to provide a level playing field to wind generators and eventually reduce curtailments.

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  • Repowering June 2016

    WindEurope expects up to 76GW of installed wind energy capacity to reach the end of their operational life between 2020 and 2030. Repowering allows harnessing more wind power whilst preserving jobs for local communities. The position paper lays out how member states can incentivise repowering, alongside greenfield projects, to help meet the 2030 targets cost-effectively.

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  • Industry statement: Making the EU ETS relevant after the Paris Agreement June 2016

    Despite adopting measures such as backloading, the Market Stability Reserve (MSR) and an increased Linear Reduction Factor (LRF), the surplus of allowances will continue to depress the market in the short to medium term, keeping ETS ineffective as a robust carbon price signal until late into the 2020s. We, a group of companies involved across the energy sector, urge you to use the current revision of EU ETS to deliver the required low carbon investment signals to meet the long term objective agreed in Paris.

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  • Balancing May 2016

    Safe energy supply also depends on a balancing the electricity system. A number of generation and demand options offer balancing services today. From a technical point of view, wind power plants could already contribute to these services but in most cases the markets are not well-suited for the participation of renewable energy technologies. This is why WindEurope has developed the industry’s “ten commandments” for better procurement rules and pricing system. As a general principle, all generators should have the right – but not the obligation – to participate as well as receive adequate remuneration.

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  • Renewables associations call for strong national plans on Energy Union May 2016

    The EU renewable energy sector welcomes the development of integrated national plans and reports as part of the governance of the Energy Union but stresses that streamlining of planning and reporting obligations should not come at the expense of detailed and good quality data. National plans for the post-2020 period should be based on standardised, binding templates enshrined in legislation to ensure the cost-effective delivery of the 2030 EU renewables target. The European Commission should also pursue an active political dialogue with Member States to make sure that concrete national commitments and enabling policies for renewables are in place in due time.

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  • Renewables associations call on EC to model higher RES targets May 2016

    To maintain global leadership in renewables, Europe should now make a firm and resolute commitment to a flourishing and vibrant domestic renewable energy market by 2030. The European renewables industry calls on the European Commission to factor in higher renewable energy ambition in the post-2020 Renewable Energy Directive.

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  • Principles for an effective Innovation Fund April 2016

    To become the world’s number one in renewable energy technologies, it is vital for the EU and its member states to bolster leading technologies in Europe’s renewable energy industry through strong industrial and innovation policies. The new Innovation Fund should build on the lessons learnt from the NER 300 to further boost investments in innovative and sustainable energy technologies.

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  • WindEurope’s position on the post-2020 Renewable Energy Directive April 2016

    A robust post-2020 renewables regulatory framework is key to securing the EU’s position as the world number one in renewables and maximising the benefits of wind deployment to the European economy. WindEurope believes that Member States will need to raise ambition towards a collective EU renewables target of at least 30% to match international competition and foster a vibrant home market sustaining the European wind industry’s competitive edge and technology innovation efforts.

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  • WindEurope response to public consultation on “Streamlining planning and reporting obligations as part of the Energy Union governance” April 2016

    On 11 January 2016, the European Commission launched a public consultation on national planning and reporting obligations for the post-2020 period in the framework of the Energy Union governance regime. WindEurope calls for a reliable planning and reporting process that can provide early visibility on national 2030 renewable energy commitments and policies and ensure the cost-effective delivery of the binding EU renew¬able energy target.

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